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June 26, 2009

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RMA

A postscript: I have just made one of these jewels with lime juice instead of lemon. Not authentic, but I like it even better. Lime and gin are a traditional combo anyway, and it's less sweet than the lemon version.

stella

"Maraschino liqueur... is most definitely not associated with maraschino cherries. Rather, it is a distilled liqueur dating back to the 16th century."
You're wrong.

http://whatscookingamerica.net/History/MaraschinoCherry.htm

...tells of how the pickled cherries became a popular delicacy but, more from economy than temperance, cherry producers developed a way to brine the fruit without the imported alcohol at all.

RMA

Today's maraschino cherries have no connection with the liqueur. What is manufactured and sold today in the United States as a maraschino cherry has almost nothing in common with the original except its name. The cherries are not the Marasca variety, and have most of their flavor and color removed in processing. Your link confirms that.

They are made from very different varieties of cherries than the marasca which is the source of the liqueur and the name. They are a manufactured attempt to make something that looked like the original thing, but even that has gone way off the tracks. The modern maraschino cherry, as your article says, is bleached, dyed, chemically hardened, and soaked in corn syrup.

Insert the word "modern" in the line of mine you quoted to make it more precisely accurate. The point is that Maraschino liqueur has no relation to the modern U.S. product other than the name and a sordid history of plasticizing a natural product which your Oregon industry led. It is certainly the case that the "juice" from a jar of these candied fruits bears no resemblance to the liqueur.

Your Oregon product was required to be labeled "Imitation Maraschino Cherries" for decades. The FDA, in its usual deference to commerce, redefined maraschino cherries in 1940:

The term "Maraschino Cherries" is regarded as the common or usual name of an article consisting of cherries which have been dyed red, impregnated with sugar and packed in a sugar sirup flavored with oil of bitter almonds or a similar flavor.

(http://tinyurl.com/p9l4jg)

No Marasacas, no alcohol, nothing like the liqueur.

Dating Rulebook

The latter item is most definitely not associated with maraschino cherries. Rather, it is a distilled liqueur dating back to the 16th century.

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